progesterone

Teamwork makes the Dream Work for PTB in Ohio

"Individually we are one drop, but together we are an ocean." -Ryunosuke Satoro. The wisdom underlying the power of teamwork has never been so true as when it is applied to delivering medical care. From restructuring care teams to center around patients and their families to encouraging collaboration between medical centers, improvements in medicine rely on increasing teamwork. A collaborative in Ohio has recently shown the tremendous benefits that can be achieved in the field of obstetrics when groups team up to prevent preterm birth through better access to progesterone treatments. 

12/9/16 Weekly Top 5: Vasopressin, Conception, & Delivering Bad News

This week the Florida governor reported that Florida is now free of Zika transmission. Hopefully that statement holds true once winter is over. In the meantime, here are this week's Top 5 Women's Health Articles, covering vasopressin for cesarean section, odds of conception depending on age, effects on patients and doctors after stillbirth, progesterone for preterm labor, and the annual MD&M conference.

11/18/16 This Week's Top 5 for World Prematurity Day

This week marked the annual World Prematurity Day (Nov. 17) in which parents, providers, researchers and others come together to work towards advancements in preventing preterm births. As the number one cause of neonatal death, prematurity is one of the biggest challenges facing obstetrics. Read on for the Top Five facts about prematurity from this week.

Progesterone and Preemies and Policy, Oh my!

There are few things we can do to prevent preterm birth. One of the primary tools in the toolkit is progesterone. Mothers with a history of spontaneous preterm birth are at increased risk of a repeat preterm birth and are routinely prescribed progesterone to decrease this risk. Another group of women who benefit from progesterone therapy are women with a short cervical length. How would you know if someone has a short cervix? One way is to measure the cervical length with ultrasound- but who should get this ultrasound exam? Everyone? Just high-risk women? Is this strategy cost-effective? And, are women who are eligible even getting their treatment?