menopause

10/28/16 This Week's Must Read Women's Health Articles

Perhaps mirroring the fact that we're heading into cold and flu season, this week's most popular articles centered on the common cold and the flu vaccine. In obstetrics and gynecology news, this week's Must Read articles cover research on choline supplements in pregnancy for preventing schizophrenia, breastfeeding and blood pressure, and UTIs. Finally, an annual report on mental healthcare in America reveals some serious deficits.

Scientists uncover biological underpinnings of synthetic mesh failures

How much time have you spent thinking about urinary incontinence? Chances are, if you are experiencing it, you’ve spent quite a lot of time considering your treatment options. After menopause, as many as 50% of women may experience urinary incontinence. Many women have turned to mesh implants that are inserted during a simple procedure. These synthetic mesh devices have been used to treat both urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse, often with great results. Unfortunately, the implants were not without side effects. In 2008, the FDA issued a Public Health Notification warning of severe complications from these implantable meshes. Many women experienced “mesh erosion” in which the mesh wore through the vaginal lining, causing significant pain and often necessitating repeat surgeries. Scientists from the University of Pittsburg have now published new data on exactly how the body interacts with these implants.

Relaxing music cuts hot flashes by one third

More than half of US women have to deal with hot flashes during menopause. Unfortunately, drugs to help reduce hot flashes either have major side effects (like increasing cancer risk!) or aren't very effective. So, researchers at University of California San Francisco set about testing a novel, non-pharmaceutical approach to decreasing the number of hot flashes women experience. Their findings were published in the Green Journal in May 2015.