hypertension

A Balancing Act: Ideal Delivery Timing & Chronic Hypertension

Delivery, like all things in life, is a balancing act, especially in the case of pregnancies with complications. Depending on the complication, be it high blood pressure or diabetes, scheduled delivery earlier than labor starts naturally can be in everyone's best interest- if the risks & benefits balance. In the case of chronic hypertension, timing of delivery must balance the risks to the infant of being born too early with the risk of stillbirth as pregnancy continues. ACOG recommendations for timing of delivery for pregnancies complicated by chronic hypertension are broad (anywhere from 36 to 39 weeks), so a new study examined the risks and benefits of delivery at each week of gestation. 

10/28/16 This Week's Must Read Women's Health Articles

Perhaps mirroring the fact that we're heading into cold and flu season, this week's most popular articles centered on the common cold and the flu vaccine. In obstetrics and gynecology news, this week's Must Read articles cover research on choline supplements in pregnancy for preventing schizophrenia, breastfeeding and blood pressure, and UTIs. Finally, an annual report on mental healthcare in America reveals some serious deficits.

Back so soon? Common reasons for postpartum readmission

After spending several days in the hospital, most people are not eager to return for another visit, especially if they are toting a newborn home. However, readmissions after delivery may be more common than you imagine. 2% of hospitalizations for delivery of an infant resulted in a readmission soon after. Is the readmission rate rising? Why are women ending up back in the hospital?

Best treatments for sudden blood pressure spikes in labor

Nothing can raise your blood pressure, quite like getting your blood pressure taken. But, for some expecting mothers, high blood pressure readings are more than just white coat hypertension. High blood pressure of pregnancy is associated with severe complications, such as preeclampsia, which can result in seizures or organ damage. New guidelines have been published to help guide doctors in treating sudden spikes in blood pressure. However, not everyone with high blood pressure during pregnancy has preeclampsia. For women with sudden increases in blood pressure during labor, what is the best treatment?