healthcare economics

A little more, A little less: Finding "Just Right"

Everyone who has ever overdosed on entire pint of Ben & Jerry's knows: you can have too much of a good thing. Modern medicine has brought about miracles, increasing our health and lifespans. However, sometimes, medicine can be too much of a good thing. Too many procedures lead to more complications. Too many medications lead to more side effects. Too many hospitalizations lead to more infections. The list goes on and on. So how can we find a balance between too much and too little in OBGYN?

12/2 LARC, Healthcare, & Fertility Ethics: Top 5 Women's Health Articles

In addition to celebrating the wonders of leftover Thanksgiving dinner (how is it possible everything tastes even better 4 days later?), this week was marked by some excellent Women's Health articles. This week's most popular health articles include: ultrasound and IUDs, the Commonwealth Fund healthcare report, ethics and ART, sales reps in the OR, and vaccination requirements.

11/11/2016 This Week's Top Health Articles

No matter how we spent this past week, we can all agree on one thing: sometimes a hug is all we need to feel better. By far the favorite health article of the week is applicable for men and women: hugs were associated with 32% decreased risk of getting a cold. Other popular article topics for the week included: birth control for men, the cost of healthcare in America, preterm labor & multiples, and the TOLAC calculator.

Progesterone and Preemies and Policy, Oh my!

There are few things we can do to prevent preterm birth. One of the primary tools in the toolkit is progesterone. Mothers with a history of spontaneous preterm birth are at increased risk of a repeat preterm birth and are routinely prescribed progesterone to decrease this risk. Another group of women who benefit from progesterone therapy are women with a short cervical length. How would you know if someone has a short cervix? One way is to measure the cervical length with ultrasound- but who should get this ultrasound exam? Everyone? Just high-risk women? Is this strategy cost-effective? And, are women who are eligible even getting their treatment?