birth

Teamwork makes the Dream Work for PTB in Ohio

"Individually we are one drop, but together we are an ocean." -Ryunosuke Satoro. The wisdom underlying the power of teamwork has never been so true as when it is applied to delivering medical care. From restructuring care teams to center around patients and their families to encouraging collaboration between medical centers, improvements in medicine rely on increasing teamwork. A collaborative in Ohio has recently shown the tremendous benefits that can be achieved in the field of obstetrics when groups team up to prevent preterm birth through better access to progesterone treatments. 

Do Different Cesarean Surgery Techniques Make a Difference?

A c-section is a c-section is a c-section. Right? Nope. There are a variety of techniques that vary from one surgeon to the next. Most patients do not realize that there are options in the ways to execute certain maneuvers, but there are quite a few for this common surgery. While each obstetrician has her favorite technique, do these variations actually make a difference in outcomes for patients? Thanks to the CORONIS trial, we now have a look into 5 different techniques.

Laughing through Labor: the new old pain relief method

Fans of “Call the Midwife” might recall the adorable scene in which Chummy demonstrates how to use “the gas” during labor for pain relief only to over-inhale and fall blissfully into the hospital bed. Most Americans have never heard of using laughing gas for labor pains since epidurals became the anesthesia-du-jour in the 1970s and are now used by the vast majority of women in the US. However, people looking for relief have used laughing gas since the 1800s, usually for dental procedures. In the early 1900’s, laughing gas was introduced for labor, but never gained lasting traction in the US. Now, thanks to a small resurgence in popularity, you may see “laughing gas” on the menu of options at your hospital.

11/4/2016 This Week’s Must-Read Women’s Health Articles

Welcome to November! It’s hard to believe the fall is coming to a close, especially here in San Francisco where the weather has been sunny! This week’s most popular women’s health articles are all pregnancy and obstetrics-related.  Three of the articles seek to explain risk factors for preterm birth: obesity and prior cesarean delivery. The fourth article provides an update on the fight to curb the spread of Zika, and finally we take a “sunny-side-up” look at OP fetal positioning.

Confused by the 3rd Presidental Debate? What is peri-viable birth?

After the third presidential debate, you may have left scratching your head: what exactly are “partial births”? The Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recently published a consensus statement on “periviable birth,” which are births between 20 and 25 weeks gestation. Read on to learn exactly why birth at this age is controversial and what interventions are recommended and not. (For the record, I am just assuming that’s what the candidates were discussing. I could be wrong!)

How much weight your mother gained in pregnancy could influence your weight 40 years later

I’ve covered numerous new studies relating to the effects of weight gain in pregnancy, but the most recent study covers the longest timespan yet: forty years. Prior research has shown that excess weight gain in pregnancy predisposes infants to obesity in childhood and adolescence. But what about in adulthood? A new study followed up with daughters forty years after their mothers were enrolled in a clinical trial in the 1960’s. Read on to learn about the surprising results.