Zika

Top 5 Pregnancy Facts from SMFM 2017

Every January, the Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine hosts their annual conference, "The Pregnancy Meeting." I was honored to be able to join the party this year in Las Vegas, where hundreds of brilliant OBGYNs and MFM specialists came together to summit on the latest research pertaining to pregnancy. Naturally, I dutifully collected the most interesting factoids for my blog and Twitter friends. Below are the five most popular findings, as voted by the awesome @Elmtreemedical Twitter community.

12/16/16 Poo, Voice Recognition, & Zika After Pregnancy: Top 5 Health Articles

Who would have thought that, by far, the most popular health article this week is entitled "Poo Saves"?! It's been another interesting week in health articles. This week's topics include fecal transplants, voice recognition software, Zika testing after pregnancy, risks to infants from maternal infections during pregnancy, and cervical cancer screening interval extension to 10 years.

11/4/2016 This Week’s Must-Read Women’s Health Articles

Welcome to November! It’s hard to believe the fall is coming to a close, especially here in San Francisco where the weather has been sunny! This week’s most popular women’s health articles are all pregnancy and obstetrics-related.  Three of the articles seek to explain risk factors for preterm birth: obesity and prior cesarean delivery. The fourth article provides an update on the fight to curb the spread of Zika, and finally we take a “sunny-side-up” look at OP fetal positioning.

10/21/2016 This Week's Must Read Women's Health Articles

Last week's Top 5 list got lots of love from Twitter (thank you all!), so here is the next installment. I hope you enjoy this week's selection of popular articles. Topics include severe maternal morbidity, urogynecology surgeries, laboring down, male infertility, and delayed effects of Zika. The laboring down article is especially interesting and potentially practice-changing.

Does Zika Cause Microcephaly? The Causation Conundrum

A twenty-two year old Brazilian woman gives birth to her second daughter and is surprised in the delivery room. Her baby girl’s head looks drastically different from her first daughter’s. What happened? she asks her obstetrician. She did not have any ultrasounds in her third trimester, so the diagnosis of microcephaly is a surprise. However, she does recall a few days at the end of her first trimester when she had a mild fever and a rash. She also recalls many mosquito bites throughout her pregnancy. Her doctor tells her that she was probably infected with the Zika virus. Can her doctor tell her that Zika caused the microcephaly? Have scientists proven a causative connection?